Little super hero

Posted November 8, 2018 at 2:38 pm


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sarahm@ncppub.com

Lillian Michelle Tracy has quite a story to tell in her short year of life. At 20 weeks gestation, a routine ultrasound that checks a baby’s anatomy and reveals gender, turned joy into worry for Tanner and Alex Tracy. “At 20 weeks we found out Lilly was going to be born with a sacrococcygeal teratoma,” Alex explained. This teratoma was located at the base of the tailbone or coccyx. These non-malignant tumors can grow very large and obstruct normal formation of anatomy. “We were immediately in denial, but after we had time to let it sink in we were terrified,” said Alex.  “After four weeks, the teratoma had grown and started to obstruct her ureters leading from her kidneys, causing her kidneys to dilate to a dangerous level,” Alex said. Because of the teratoma, the amniotic fluid around Lilly was decreased so Alex was flown to Denver, Colorado, in hopes of having a procedure to drain the teratoma back into the amniotic sac. This type of procedure was not without risk, but the teratoma was punctured and started to decompress. After a week in Colorado, Alex was back home and Sanford was be handling her care. “Sanford was more than confident and had other babies with the same teratoma before, which made us feel more relieved,” Alex stated.

Please see this week’s edition of the West Lyon Herald for the full story.

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